Hosting a Charity Event With a "Casino Theme" in Michigan

In Michigan, there are several ways for nonprofit / charitable organizations to host a “Casino Night / Las Vegas Party”, a fundraising event with a “casino theme”. They can do a State licensed, “Millionaire’s Party”, work with a local Charity Poker Room or produce their own Casino themed fundraiser / gala event

1. Host your own event

If your group is a registered charity (i.e.; 501(c) 3 or with a similar charitable designation), then you can apply to the State to obtain a license to host a Millionaire’s Party (this license will allows you to host a Texas Hold ‘Em Poker Tournament as well), similar to what you might see being done at summer festivals and events held at many churches throughout the State. These events are like walking into a “real casino”, where your guests purchased their chips, play the various games and then at the end either “cash out” their chips for money, redeem them for prizes, etc.

There is a registration fee of fifty dollars ($50.00) per day for this license and you can get a license good for up to four consecutive days. Your group you can obtain up to four (4) of these licenses per calendar year. To obtain this license, there is extensive paperwork that needs to be completed and then more post-event paperwork to be submitted to the State as well. You should start your licensing application process as early as possible, since the State is currently telling people, that you should allow at least six (6) to eight (8) weeks for the processing of their application. And since you’re required to have your license number on all flyers and other promotional materials, you’re not supposed to advertise your event until you have your license. Also, you will need to follow all of the State’s rules and regulations pertaining to the operation of this event.

The key to this being a successful fundraising event, is that you need to have your group’s members and supporters, show up, participate in the games, and lose money at the games. The more money they lose, the more money your group will make.

You can visit the State’s website (see website address in Section 2 below) for more information on how to run your event, to obtain your licensing application and a list of licensed equipment suppliers.

2. Work with a local, Charity Poker Room

Due to the current popularity of playing Texas Hold ‘Em Poker on television, within the last couple of years many Charity Poker Rooms, have opened throughout the State. Many of these Rooms have become so popular, and have such a large following, that they’re now open seven nights a week.

If such a Charity Poker Rooms exists in your area, you might want to check them out. If your group qualifies for a State license, you might want to consider working with them rather than hosting your own event. You’ll still need to follow all of these State’s rules and regulations pertaining to the operation of your event, but the Room will be able to assist you through this process.

The key reason to work with these Charity Poker Rooms is that you really don’t have to worry about your group’s members and supporters showing up for this type of an event, for it to be successful.

Now here comes a paradigm shift… your members and supporters don’t really have to show up at this fundraiser for it to be successful! If the Charity Poker Rooms is a well established charity poker room, they will have a group of loyal poker players that will show up and play, no matter who the charity is. Groups working with these established Charity Poker Rooms can typically expect to earn between $1,000 to $4,000 per four (4) day run, which isn’t too bad of a return for your $200 investment for your license.

Again you can visit the State’s website ( http://www.michigan.gov/cg/0,4547,7-111-35016—,00.html) for more information on how to run your event and to obtain your license application.

3. Host a Casino Night / Las Vegas themed party / gala event

Similar to having a traditional “dinner / dance, fundraiser”, instead of having dancing as the featured entertainment for your fundraiser / gala, you would have “just for fun” gaming.

Your guests would pay an admission price to attend your event / gala, and for this, they would receive some sort of refreshments, one (1) door price ticket, a predetermined amount of chips or “funny money” and the chance to participate in the “just of fun” gaming entertainment.

Then at the end of the event, your guests would convert all of their “winnings” into additional door prize tickets, and you would have drawings for various door prizes (and hopefully all of these prizes would have been donated to your group).

The key to remember here is that since the chips have no monetary value, and you cannot “buy” additional chips, this is not “real gambling” (remember it is only “just for fun” gaming), and therefore a State license is not required.

Also with this type of event you want to keep the focus on having fun, and not on who has won the most. Remember that with everyone’s admission to your event, they received one (1) door price ticket, so a person could come to your event, not participate in any of the gaming, but could still walk away with a door prize at the end.

And like any traditional fundraiser that your organization might conduct, you’re able to determine the amount of profit that this event will generate, since you already know all of your fixed costs (i.e.; refreshments / food, gaming equipment rentals, profit required per person, etc.), you just set your admission price appropriately. Also you will be able capitalize on several additional fundraising opportunities at your event, such as selling of gaming table sponsorships, selling of specialty drinks at the event, etc.

From Bingo Supplies to Bingo Programs – How to Run a Successful Bingo Fundraiser Part 3

If you’ve read our first article “From-Bingo-Supplies-to-Bingo-Programs—How-to-Run-a-Successful-Bingo-Fundraiser-Part-1”, you should have checked out the licensing requirements for bingos in your state and determined a rough idea of how many bingo players will be attendance. If you’ve read the 2nd article, “From-Bingo-Supplies-to-Bingo-Programs—How-to-Run-a-Successful-Bingo-Fundraiser-Part-2” you’ve built your bingo program and picked your bingo prize payouts.

Now let’s look at the revenue generators or the bingo products you’ll sell at your bingo.

Bingo Books & Admission

Many bingos will sell an admission package to each bingo player when they arrive. This package usually sells for around $20 and includes entry to the event, a bingo book with bingo sheets for each game in the bingo program, and perhaps an added bonus such as a free dauber or an extra bingo sheet for a jackpot game.

If you have early bird games (a handful of games before your main bingo program), you should sell bingo books for them for around $3-$5. Additionally, extra bingo books should be sold (usually for $5-$15 each) at a discount to the admission price. Finally, it’s a good idea to sell extra single bingo sheets for the larger prize (jackpot) games.

If you choose not to have an admission package, you can simply sell bingo books for a set price once the bingo players have entered.

Raffles

Raffles are a great way to earn additional funds during your bingo event. During the night, have a friendly person walk around selling with a smile. If possible, it’s a good idea to advertise and presell the raffle tickets beforehand.

You can have 50/50 raffles (where 50% of the proceeds go to the prize), or raffle off one or more prizes. Your prizes should be good quality and have obvious value. Don’t be cheap!

Be careful, raffles, like bingos, can also fall under state regulation. Be sure you find out your state’s policy on raffles beforehand.

Pulltabs

Like raffle tickets, pulltabs (charity tickets) are a great way to increase sales and revenues during a bingo. A pulltab is a similar to a scratch off lottery ticket, but instead it has a number of “windows” that are peeled open to reveal a possible prize. Each box of pulltabs contains a set amount of prizes (usually around 75% of the take). Therefore, each box (once sold) is guaranteed a certain profit.

Pulltabs come in a variety of games and styles. If you decide to sell pulltabs, make sure you know how each game is played beforehand.

Be warned! Pulltabs are even more heavily regulated than bingos. Be sure that they are legal in your state. And, if they are legal, make sure that you are properly licensed to sell them.

Bingo Supplies

Bingo supplies, especially bingo paper, can be a little confusing. If you are unfamiliar with bingo, ordering the proper bingo books can be difficult. We recommend you read “How to Order Bingo Paper” on the Wholesale Bingo Supplies website for a quick overview and for some idea what bingo paper cuts and sizes that bingo paper comes in.

Make sure you order your bingo supplies in advance to give yourself some time. You’ll likely need the following, bingo books, additional bingo sheets for jackpot games, bingo daubers (markers for the players), and raffle tickets and pulltabs (if legal in your area). If you’re unsure of what bingo supplies you need, visit Wholesale Bingo Supplies

If you plan on hosting bingos on a regular basis, you might even consider purchasing an advanced bingo console and bingo equipment. But, this can get pricey. For an annual bingo, it’s best to find bingo equipment you can borrow. Also, you can get by purchasing a low-cost, quality, bingo cage.

Bingo Callers

If at all possible, find an experienced bingo caller. You don’t want some novice person calling bingo who has trouble handling the equipment (dropping bingo balls in the middle of a game can be a disaster) or lacks confidence in front of people. If you can’t find an experienced caller, then find someone who is comfortable with crowds and have them practice with the equipment ahead of time. Go over your bingo program step-by-step.

Whether experienced or not, you want your bingo callers to call numbers at a regular pace. We recommend that bingo numbers be called about every 20 seconds for commercial bingo hall environments where seasoned bingo players play. However, this speed should be adjusted to fit your crowd and the number of bingo faces in play. Hopefully, your bingo equipment will have a timer which will alert your caller when to call. However, if no timer is available, use a watch or clock as best you can to call at a regular pace.

Cash vs Baskets or Other Prizes

It doesn’t make a lot of difference if you give away cash or prizes or a mixture of both at your bingo fundraiser. The important thing is to make sure that whatever you give, you are giving something with value.

Make your bingo prizes worth the effort for your bingo players. If you give bingo baskets, fill them with quality products. If you give cash, make sure you give away some big jackpots. When your bingo players win a bingo, they want win something and they want to win something good.

Bingo Concessions

Your bingo event will usually last from 3-5 hours, with the actual bingo program taking about 3 hours to play. Therefore, it is important to have refreshments and food available if possible. Bingo players are not robots. They will get hungry and thirsty.

Make sure that the food you serve is good quality and keep your prices reasonable. We believe it’s smart business to have your bingo concession be a draw for your bingo event and not a profit center. Let your bingo games make the money while your concession keeps them well-nourished and happy.

A bingo fundraiser requires planning. You’ll need to assemble a team of volunteers, find a qualified bingo caller, acquire prize donations, locate a site, advertise, and more. Make sure you give yourself at least a month or two to prepare.

Good luck and happy fundraising! If you follow our advice, we’re sure your next bingo fundraiser will be a success.

A Guide For How To Pick An Online Poker Site For New Players

If you have decided that you would like give online poker a try, you will be faced with a lot of different choices where to play. As a beginner, you should pick the poker site where you will get the most bang for your buck. When deciding where to play, the following six items are what you should be looking for in a poker site:

1. Wide variety of poker games – Whether you want to play Texas Hold’em, 7-Card Stud, 5-Card Draw or Omaha, the poker site you select should offer all of these games and more.

2. Low stakes for beginners – The best poker sites offer real money betting stakes as low as $0.02, which is very affordable for beginning players as they learn.

3. First time deposit bonuses – Most sites will give you a cash bonus when you deposit real money for the first time for trying their site. The requirement usually is that you play a set number of hands, then the bonus money is yours to keep.

4. Frequent reload deposit bonuses – The best sites will also offer periodical reload deposit bonuses. These work like the first time deposit bonus and all you need to do is deposit money into your account and you will be offered another cash bonus.

5. VIP Club and Benefits – The best poker sites have VIP clubs where you are rewarded for your frequent pay. The benefits offered vary and often include things like computer equipment, i-pods, clothing and gift certificates.

6. Large numbers of players – The best sites have a large number of players who call the site their home for poker, ensuring that there will always be a game ready and waiting when you want to play any time of the day. A site with a lot of players is a strong indicator of a good poker site.

When you find a site with these six characteristics, you will have found a top notch poker site to call home!

Acey-Deucey – Sailors’ Backgammon

The backgammon variation Acey-Deucey was a popular pastime among the US Marine Corps during World War I. An article published in the backgammon site Play65 reveals that the game has been entertaining Navy officers already in the beginning of the 1900s. It also shows that even the name “Acey-Deucey” has its roots in the American Navy’s slang.

Acey-Deucey is the nickname given to the dice roll of 1-2. Normally a disadvantageous roll, the Acey-Deucey roll grants its thrower with special privileges: the right to play a desired double of his choice, plus an additional role (on top of the 1-2 roll). Acey and Deucey were also the nicknames of the First and Second Class Petty Officers (respectively), who also entertained themselves in Acey-Deucey Clubs and Lounges.

Acey-Deucey was not the sole occupancy of the command echelon; sailors used to pass the time between one mission to another rolling dice and moving checkers. Acey-Deucey was everywhere, testified one sailor in a letter to the Time’s editor in 1930, “the deck, below decks, in the engine room, the dynamo room and in the turrets and handling rooms”, and was never spotted among the combat corps.

Although Acey-Deucey can be played on the same equipment used in backgammon games, playing the game on the shaky grounds of the sea required some innovations. Therefore, to protect the dice and checkers from sliding and slipping, a special border was built around the backgammon board and the dice were dropped to the playing surface through a tube.

Acey Deucey Rules & Strategy

The acey-deucey advantage is one of the main differences between the standard backgammon and the mariners’ favorite variation. Backgammon and Acey-Deucey also differ in their initial board setup and their final scoring; the Acey-Deucey game begins with both players’ checkers based outside the board and it ends with the loser sacrificing one point for every checker that was not borne off the board.

Despite the great 1-2 benefit and the fact that Acey-Deucey is played without the doubling cube, the game does leave some room for preplanned strategy. Acey-Deucey strategy would focus on the early game, when both players enter the checkers to the board according to the rolls of the dice, the same way players remove their checkers of the board at the end of the backgammon game. Reasonable Acey-Deucey strategy may include quick entering of most checkers and using them to block the opponent’s checkers.